cat-education

Two Hawke's Bay schools slated to close.

 

It's the start of the Easter school holidays today but two rural schools in Hawke's Bay aren't celebrating the time off.

 

Read more: Two Hawke's Bay schools slated to close.

Building apprentice Sam Talbot nails the Hawkes Bay Carpentry Apprentice Challenge

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Winner of the Hawke's Bay Carpentry Apprentice Challenge Sam Talbot paced himself perfectly to claim a place in the national finals being held later this year.

"It's not a race," says Sam, who feels he learnt from competing in the last two events. "It's a lot easier knowing more and this year I took my time."

Sam was one of eight top EIT apprentices selected to take part in the regional challenge. Each competitor was asked to build a garden bench under pressure of time and watched by shoppers and supporters at the TUMU ITM centre in Napier.

EIT programme coordinator Shane Sigglekow says the eight-hour project was challenging, involving some complex joints. The judges, who included Certified Builders Hawke's Bay president Alan Whyte, were looking for professionalism and work methods rather than just speed.

"It was a close finish with only one point separating Sam and runner-up Mark Gill from Dunnett Builders," says Shane. "Third placed was Geoff Eager who works for Concept Master Builders."

As the winner, Sam will now go up against nine other regional finalists competing for $70,000 in prizes at the national finals, to be held on June 26 as a highlight of the Certified Builders Conference in Hamilton.

From Hastings, Sam explored his interest in building through a Gateway programme while at St John's College in Hastings. After leaving school, he completed EIT's nine-month Certificate in Carpentry programme.

With the theory from the pre-trades course under his belt, he is now progressing through the National Certificate in Carpentry (Level 4) units while working for builder Paul Boaler. Sam is looking forward to completing his apprenticeship this year.

Asked what it is that he likes about building, the 23-year-old says: "Being outdoors and doing something different every day."

Seeing building as a portable career, his longer term goals are to travel and eventually to have his own business.

"We'll see where it takes me," he says.

The outdoor bench seats built by the apprentices are to donated to local charities.

Hastings students practice what to do in an emergency

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Students from Hukarere College will take part in an evacuation exercise tomorrow.

Hastings District Council Emergency Management Officer Warren Meldrum says "We have been working in the Esk Valley for some time with community response planning and this exercise is part of that process. There are two actions which can be taken in an emergency: shelter in place or evacuate and tomorrow we are practicing evacuation with the students, should the need ever arise"

"Tomorrow's exercise is aimed at ensuring the safety of the students during an emergency. Civil Defence volunteers will be educating staff and students about the evacuation procedures and familiarising them with the evacuation route to an alternate venue.

Warren Meldrum says "This exercise is not only valuable in confirming that the students are well briefed about the evacuation procedure but it will also ensure that Civil Defence systems are in place should there be an emergency situation that requires the evacuation of the school. It is important that the evacuation is undertaken in an orderly and timely fashion. Part of the monitoring of the exercise will be to ensure that the whole exercise is completed in a reasonable amount of time."

The exercise begins at 9am when the 120 students and staff will begin the evacuation to higher ground at the Colonial Museum. This will require the evacuees to cross State Highway 5 and Civil Defence staff will be located along the route to ensure the safety of the evacuees. The students will return to school at around midday.

Traffic management will be in place along the evacuation route to ensure the safety of staff and students.

What: Evacuation of Hukarere College

When: Saturday 5th April

Time: 9am to 12 noon

EIT Hawkes Bay graduate welcomes a career in design

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By building on her strengths, budding freelance designer Sacha van den Berg feels she is finally heading in the right direction.

Born and raised in Hastings, Sacha has always been creative and wanted to go on to study art. But as a school-leaver, she was warned she wouldn't be able to make a living from arts and design. So she chose to pursue a career in hospitality instead.

As a 19-year-old, she moved to Gisborne to manage a restaurant - "a big three hours up the road," she laughs. "I hated it. I enjoyed the people interaction. The hardest part was the behind-the-scene management and the hours. It was a lot of work for very little return."

After studying photography in Wellington, Sacha returned to Hawke's Bay and enrolled for ideaschool's Bachelor of Visual Arts and Design. She graduated from EIT in mid-March.

"Now I feel I am almost on the right tracks," she says. "I am definitely in the realm I want to be in and am trying a lot of different things. I want a lot of practical experience, to pursue a master's degree and ultimately to teach."

Coming to degree studies in her late twenties has given Sacha time to develop self-awareness.

"Sometimes I think if I went back I may have done it differently, but actually I'm happy with where I'm at. The hospitality work has given me a lot of skills I may not have otherwise had like how to deal with people and how to communicate - big things if you're working in the creative world.

"It's taught me patience and not to be afraid of the big hours. The experience in hospitality definitely helps with doing this. Working 60 hours a week is normal in hospitality." Sacha is working part-time at the cellar door at Clearview Estate while she develops her design practice's client base.

"I'm not earning enough from my business to pay the bills but I now think there is money to be made in design. It's about being very disciplined, very strict and very good at time management. I'm still working on that," she adds with a grin. "It's quite different, with clients taking the role of my lecturers and setting the deadlines for myself."

Sacha says ideaschool studies helped her develop confidence in her design abilities.

"EIT was so nurturing, so supportive. If you have an idea they push you to explore it and then some.

"I think the way ideaschool structures its courses and the daily interactions nurture individual students rather than en masse. And because the Bachelor of Visual Arts and Design is a multidisciplinary degree, you can seek guidance from any of the lecturers."

Looking forward to what's ahead, Sacha says "I am excited. I've got the skills, I've got the experience and I can jump in and get it done."

Discover extraordinary living objects at MTG Hawkes Bay

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The Transmogrifier Machine presents its inaugural public viewing of extraordinary living objects at MTG Hawke's Bay from 29 March to 24 August 2014.

From old to new, unclaimed furniture items are modified and tuned, reconfigured by the Machine into unique pieces that celebrate use, character and non-conformity.

You might know some of the characters in this exhibition from their previous lives.

Their stories are on display, but they are new again.

These objects have moved from the op shop to the gallery floor, bringing a history, and an evolution which takes them into the realm of the extraordinary.

The Transmogrifier Machine produces an ongoing line of original, usable, and collectable pieces.

The Machine is operated by Katy Wallace, a Gisborne-based furniture designer and maker.

"The machine has a life of its own, I am often surprised which direction it steers me next - it's wonderful," says Katy Wallace.

MTG Hawke's Bay is pleased to be the first venue to host the Transmogrifier Machine.

It will then be travelling to Tairawhiti Museum, Gisborne in October 2014, Objectspace, Auckland in February 2015 and finally to Art + Object, Auckland where all pieces will be auctioned in March 2015.

The Machine's progress and upcoming exhibition/auction information can be followed on facebook, or at www.katywallace.co.nz.

Join Katy for an Artist Floortalk at MTG Hawke's Bay at 11am on Saturday 21 June 2014 to discover more about the Transmogrifier Machine.

A Central Hawke's Bay school closes it's doors after 88 years.

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Crownthorpe School in the heart of Central Hawkes Bay first opened their doors 88 years ago and will soon close them for good.

With a role of just nine children the Ministry of Education decided last year to close the school despite spending $400,000 on new classrooms in 2010.

Situated 25 kilometers west of Hastings the school had gradually seen a decrease in the role over the years. 

The area was primarily a dairy farming region but big land use changes have meant an increase in vineyards, lifestyle blocks and the development of a big dairy operation.

Although theses changes have meant an increase in the regions population most of the people moving into the area are not school aged children.

Principal Alan Beeden, who has been in the job for 20 years, decided that rather than fight the inevitable he would work with the ministry to do the best for the kids.

When Mr Beeden first arrived with his wife Jan from England the school had a roll of 35.

At the schools peak in 1970 it reached 70 and seven years ago it climbed to more than 60.