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Stuart Nash MP for Napier

Chinese couple hone their English at EIT Hawke's Bay

ChinaCouple2

Coming to New Zealand from a bustling city in southern China, Manka Li and Nicko Liang were drawn to the calm and quiet of Hawke’s Bay.

The pair moved to Napier three years ago, wanting to integrate into a smaller community and having learnt about study opportunities at EIT.

Both grew up in GuangZhou, formerly known as Canton, a port city which has a population of 12 million-plus.

Working as a nurse in A & E, Nicko wanted a change from his demanding life.

"In New Zealand, there isn’t that much pressure. In China, every day is busy, busy, busy. A hospital’s ER [emergency room] can handle 800 patients in 24 hours."

Manka, 24, says it was different for her.

"I graduated in interior design and felt it was a good idea to go overseas while we were still young."

The couple, who married in January 2013, initially moved into homestay accommodation.

"The first week we arrived, our English was really limited," says Manka. "But we had lovely homestay hosts who have become our friends. Every day, they spent a lot of time with us, helping us develop our English.

"We realised then that to improve our language skills we had to use our English conversationally."

Of course, once they started working, Manka and Nicko had no option other than to speak in English.

Having enrolled in EIT’s English for Living (ELC) programme, they found what they were studying very helpful. The programme helps students to use English in undertaking daily activities such as shopping, visiting the doctor, supporting children at school, filling out forms, banking and using the phone.

Both had studied English at school, Manka from the age of eight and Nicko since he was about 11 years old.

"A lot of parents," Nicko says, "prefer their children to start learning the language earlier than that."

Although they chat to one another in their mother tongue and discovered they could use Cantonese on a recent trip to Auckland, they appreciate the need for English in their daily lives. As Manka says, "when you have communication with somebody, you also learn from them."

Now she is interested in enrolling in EIT’s IELTS preparation classes, which are designed to improve students’ test-taking strategies by familiarising them with the test format and improving their level of English.

The couple hope to stay in New Zealand for the same reasons they chose to come here.

"I think we are quite lucky," Nicko says of their move.

The next EIT intake for English for Living Levels 1 and 2 classes starts on 23 July and continues every Thursday evening through to September 24. Level 2 classes run from 22 July to 23 September on Wednesdays from 10am to noon and Fridays from 10.30am to 12.30pm.

There are also EIT programmes for those who don’t speak English as a first language but want to prepare for certificate, diploma or degree-level study.

Clues 27-29 for Hawke's Bay students to find the Amazing China Face

AmazingChinaFace1

THE AMAZING CHINA FACE RACE CLUES: Identify the three areas from today’s clues and delete them from your search. The China Face is not here:

Clue 27
This Administrative Unit has a history of habitation going back 3000 years; it has a New Zealand Sister City; it was a capital city during the Jin Dynasty; a UNESCO World Heritage site was registered here in the 1980s; it has a 91,000 people capacity stadium; it is home to the grandest tomb cluster in China; in 1989 a pro-democracy demonstration by students ended in many deaths; a cathedral was built here during reign of Emperor Shunzhi.

Clue 28 
This Province has nine Prefecture level cities; Biang Biang noodles are popular here; it is home of Foreign Affairs Office No 280 jiefang lu; a city here was final destination of the ‘Long March’; a peasant farmer discovered the eighth Wonder of the World here less than 50 years ago; C/1556D1 appeared the year of a great calamity.

Clue 29
This Administrative Unit has a huge population; from Hastings to this place, using great circle distance, is 10568kms; it received its name in 1189; 1300 people a day move here to live; it has 19,000 buses and 23,000 taxis; the value of its imports and exports for the first 4 months of 2015 was 185 Billion RMB; it was a provisional Capital for Chinag Kia Shek. ‪#‎amazingchinafacerace‬

For previous clues CLICK HERE

To read more about the Amazing China Face Race CLICK HERE

The Governor General attends the Napier Library's first All Ears Dog Reading session

Dog4Reading

Yesterday Napier Libraries warmly welcomed Their Excellencies, Lieutenant General The Right Honourable Sir Jerry Mateparae, and Lady Janine Mateparae.

As part of their Hawke's Bay visit, they popped into the Napier Library to see the All Ears Dog Reading Programme in action.

The newly developed canine reading programme is aimed at building the confidence of young readers by having them read aloud to a dog as well as teaching children how to be safe around animals.

Overseas studies have shown reading to animals is proven to remove stress and peer pressure often experienced by children who are still learning to read.

All Ears is a co-operative project between the Napier City Council Animal Control team and the NapierLibrary.

Junior readers participating in the programme are recommended by local remedial teachers. The first intake will be four students from Napier Central School.

The project has recruited its first dog to be part of the programme - a 9 year old Harrier hound called Lady Venice. In a former life, she ran with hunting horses but now in retirement, there’s nothing Lady Venice enjoys more than listening to a good story.

"Reading dogs aid young struggling readers by sitting quietly with each one and ‘listening’ as the child reads aloud to them," said Napier Libraries manager Sheryl Reed. "Though typically self-conscious reading to another person, children with reading difficulties are much more relaxed with a friendly dog who doesn’t criticise their efforts or laugh at their mistakes."

Lady Venice was rescued by Napier City Council animal control officer Liisa Jones and when she’s not listening to budding readers, she will continue to live with Liisa and her family. The first reading dog scheme was the R.E.A.D. (Reading Education Assistance Dogs) programme, set up in Salt Lake City in 1999. Since then the idea has been successfully copied all around the world, in places such as Canada, Italy, Slovenia, South Africa, and Australia.

IN A NUTSHELL: All Ears: a 3-module reading and dog confidence programme

Module One: one-on-one reading,( at the Napier Library only to start with), for four children on Fridays 4.00-5.00pm during term time. Each child will have 15 minutes each reading to Lady Venice, to build their reading confidence in a non-judgemental environment, and to develop a positive relationship with the dog. A new group of children will be selected each term.

Module Two: Dog confidence - Lady Venice will visit both Napier and Taradale libraries once or twice a year, to make a guest appearance at pre-school story time with her handler, who will teach the children how to interact successfully with Lady Venice.

Module Three: Pet care (not just dogs). Still in development. This will involve libraries in Taradale andNapier, probably in the school holidays. Likely to be a partnership with NCC Animal Control; and also Civil Defence, so that children can be taught what to do for their pets in the event of a natural disaster.

 

 

Hawke's Bay student targets wine for a sweet tooth.

LindaTatare

Studying grape growing and winemaking at EIT, Linda Tatare has already pinpointed her marketing niche – making a Gewurztraminer that appeals to the Maori palate.

Of Tuwharetoa and Ngati Porou descent, Linda was born in and has lived most of her life in Gisborne.

She “messed around” after leaving school, she says, picking grapes and taking on other horticulture-based jobs before going on to work in the banking industry for 20 years.

She resigned when that sector changed.

“In our family,” Linda observes, “education is important.”

So at the age of 58, she is studying extramurally for her Diploma in Grapegrowing and Winemaking.  Prior to that she completed an EIT bridging course in chemistry and also gained certificates in grape growing and winemaking, horticulture and agriculture through EIT Tairawhiti’s rural studies unit.

“To have credibility, you need to have further education to make wine,” she explains of her ongoing study.  “You can’t make wine with a certificate.  I want to be taken seriously.”

Linda rates her Gewurztraminer, a fragrant white varietal with medium sweetness balanced with spice to give the wine a sustained finish.  “Gewurz” is German for spice and she likes a lot of spice.  However, her interpretation tends to the sweeter rather than the off-dry end of the scale.

“I want to appeal to the Maori palate.  I believe Gewurz is a sophisticated option when we are thinking about buying wine and it is suited to a casual setting with family, friends and food.

“I’ve been really surprised at how Maori like it.  Elderly Maori women in particular tend to have sophisticated palates and appreciate the qualities of my wine.”

Linda has found her Gewurz also appeals to the younger palate.

For her first vintage last year, she made 60 dozen bottles of wine.

“I guess there are about nine dozen left.  We had a lot of fun over Christmas, gifting wine to friends and family who have supported us over the years.”

This year, production is up to 1.5 tonnes and Linda doesn’t want to go beyond that.

“This year’s a serious one,” she says of the 2015 vintage.  “We’re not messing around giving it away this time.  I have to up my business acumen, getting registered and licensed to make this happen.” 

Linda has chosen the name Rawhiti for her label – a diminutive for Tairawhiti but also meaning sunshine in Māori. 

A shareholder in Tuwharetoa Maori lands, she says the trustees are very good at supporting education.  Grants from about six land blocks have gone towards the cost of her studies, and she says she is grateful for every cent received.

“They are not large amounts, but it all helps when you’re not working.  I’ve got to do this diploma with as little lending as possible.”

She thinks of her budding business in terms of supporting further study, which may mean a further year at EIT to complete a degree.

“I don’t see winemaking supporting my life but it’s needed to support continued study and to buy contract grapes.  It may support a harvest in the Alsace wine region of France or in Germany,” she says of possible further travel with husband Jack Papuni.

“I love harvest and the care of the vineyard.  I would like to be involved in that as well as making wine – being with people, working together to bring a crop in is hard work but invigorating. 

“And I think there is a palate that has not been catered to,” she says.  “I want to address that.”

Hawke's Bay students take part in Enviroschools speech comp.

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Students from six Hawke’s Bay Enviroschools will be taking part in a speech competition on Tuesday 9 June at Napier Intermediate.

Taking part will be eleven Year 5-9 students who will deliver speeches on the theme of ‘Taking Action for a Sustainable Future’.

"This event is a first for Enviroschools Hawke’s Bay and will showcase children who are fully involved in environmental learning through their school and will have real insights to bring meaning to their speeches," says Hawke’s Bay Regional Council’s Enviroschools coordinator Sally Chandler.

"We are fortunate to have judges who are hugely interested in the environment and the development of environmental education."

National Slam poet champion, Te Kahu Rolleston will be the guest speaker and judge. Te Kahu Rolleston has a commitment to Enviroschools as a member of Te Aho Tu Roa (Kaupapa Māori partner of Enviroschools). Part of his work is to create and deliver poetry resources and workshops for youth.

Also on the judging panel are Eileen von Dadelszen from Havelock North, who is a former Regional Councillor and a current Commissioner of the NZ Environment Court, and Lara Tangiora, a Year 13 student from William Colenso College. Lara is a new member of the Youth Environment Council and the Wairoa (Yroa Ynot) Youth governance crew, has an interest in debating, and is keen to pursue a career in environmental science.

There are 50 schools and early childhood centres in Hawke’s Bay signed up as Enviroschools.

Hawke's Bay building apprentice claims national title.

LeeH2

Hastings carpentry apprentice Lee Holloway is quietly proud to have headed off 11 other regional finalists to win the Certified Builders’ Apprentice of the Year.

After winning the Hawke’s Bay ITAB’s Apprentice of the Year, Lee was flown to Christchurch to represent the region in the national event, held as part of the Certified Builders Association’s annual conference.

The competition was very close, says EIT’s carpentry apprenticeship programme coordinator Shane Sigglekow.  The range of tasks undertaken over a “full-on weekend” included introducing conference speakers and taking part in panel interviews.

Lee, who works for Simkin Construction, didn’t expect the win.

“My goal was to make the top three,” he says.  “When they announced the third and second place-getters, your chances look extremely low.  And then my name popped up.  I was taken aback really, I was proud and shocked.”

It is the second time an EIT carpentry apprentice has taken out the national title, with Paul McDowall claiming top spot in 2011.

“For a small region,” says Shane, “we consistently achieve great results nationally and our EIT carpentry programmes are recognised as among the best performing in the country.”

Lee isn’t new to competition.  Now in the final months of his apprenticeship, he first won the regional final two years ago.  He entered again last year without success but persevered, giving it another try this year.

“I thought why not, you’ve got to enter while you can.”

The 32-year-old has always been interested in building.  His grandfather and his parents role-modelled with their interest in DIY and, Lee says of his long-time commitment to projects, “I’m a kiwi, so it’s born into you.”

A major undertaking was the renovation of the family home in Akina, which now comfortably accommodates wife Gemma and the couple’s three children.

Lee started his training with the Level 3 Certificate in Carpentry and was then offered the opportunity to progress onto EIT’s National Certificate in Carpentry (Level 4) with the apprenticeship at Simkin Construction.

He loves his job, rating it the best he’s ever had.

“I feel they have supported me,” he says of the construction company, “so I’ll be staying on when I finish my apprenticeship.  I still have a lot to learn.  There is a lot of knowledge to hand down from the older guys.

“Once you sign off on your studies it doesn’t mean you know everything.”

Lee’s national title comes with an Outward Bound package, clothing and tools.  His trophy, which he will hold for the coming year, features building tools sculpted in a variety of timbers.

New animal reading programme for Napier kids.

DogReading

A newly developed canine reading programme will have its debut in Napier in next month. Called All Ears, it’s aimed at building the confidence of our young readers by having them read aloud to a dog as well as teaching children how to be safe around animals.

Overseas studies have shown reading to animals is proven to remove stress and peer pressure often experienced by children who are still learning to read.

The Governor-General, Lt Gen The Rt Hon Sir Jerry Mateparae and his wife Lady Janine Mateparae will be on hand to see the programme in action when they visit the region this month.

Unlike many other animal reading initiatives, All Ears is a one on one programme in which the child reads to the dog once a week for a full school term - allowing the reader and the dog to get to know each other. It is also designed to educate the children about being safe around animals.

All Ears is a co-operative project between the Napier City Council Animal Control team and the NapierLibrary.

Junior readers participating in the programme are recommended by local remedial teachers. The first intake will be four students from Napier Central School.

The project has recruited its first dog to be part of the programme - a 9 year old Harrier hound called Lady Venice. In a former life, she ran with hunting horses but now in retirement, there’s nothing Lady Venice enjoys more than listening to a good story.

"Reading dogs aid young struggling readers by sitting quietly with each one and ‘listening’ as the child reads aloud to them," said Napier Libraries manager Sheryl Reed. "Though typically self-conscious reading to another person, children with reading difficulties are much more relaxed with a friendly dog who doesn’t criticise their efforts or laugh at their mistakes."

Lady Venice was rescued by Napier City Council animal control officer Liisa Jones and when she’s not listening to budding readers, she will continue to live with Liisa and her family. The first reading dog scheme was the R.E.A.D. (Reading Education Assistance Dogs) programme, set up in Salt Lake City in 1999. Since then the idea has been successfully copied all around the world, in places such as Canada, Italy, Slovenia, South Africa, and Australia.

IN A NUTSHELL: All Ears: a 3-module reading and dog confidence programme

Module One: one-on-one reading,( at the Napier Library only to start with), for four children on Fridays 4.00-5.00pm during term time. Each child will have 15 minutes each reading to Lady Venice, to build their reading confidence in a non-judgemental environment, and to develop a positive relationship with the dog. A new group of children will be selected each term.

Module Two: Dog confidence - Lady Venice will visit both Napier and Taradale libraries once or twice a year, to make a guest appearance at pre-school story time with her handler, who will teach the children how to interact successfully with Lady Venice.

Module Three: Pet care (not just dogs). Still in development. This will involve libraries in Taradale andNapier, probably in the school holidays. Likely to be a partnership with NCC Animal Control; and also Civil Defence, so that children can be taught what to do for their pets in the event of a natural disaster.

 

Timber by EMSIEN-3 LTD